EPITHALAMION BY EDMUND SPENSER SUMMARY PDF

The work begins with two sonnets in which the speaker addresses his own poetry, attempting to invest his words with the power to achieve his goal the wooing of Elizabeth Boyle. From the third sonnet through the sixty-second sonnet, the speaker is in an slmost constant state of emotional turmoil and frustrated hopes. His beloved refuses to look favorably upon his suit, so his reaction ranges from desparing self-deprecation to angry tirade against her stubbornness. He uses a variety of motifs to explicate his feelings and thoughts toward the subject of his ardor: predator and prey, wartime victor and captive, fire and ice, and hard substances that eventually soften over long periods of time. In Sonnet 63, the Amoretti undergoes a drastic change in tone.

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Please Sign Up to get full document. Spencer is very methodical in his depiction of time as it passes, both in the accurate chronological sense and in the subjective sense Of time as felt by those waiting in anticipation or fear. As with most classically-inspired works, this ode begins With an invocation to the Muses to help the groom; however, in this case they are o help him awaken his bride, not create his poetic work. Then follows a growing procession of figures who attempt to bestir the bride from her bed.

Once the sun has risen, the bride finally awakens and begins her procession to the bridal bower. Stanza 1 The groom calls upon the muses to inspire him to properly sing the praises of his beloved bride. Hymen, god of marriage, is already awake, and so too should the bride arise.

If they do so, she will tread nothing but flowers on her procession from her rooms to the site of the wedding. As they adorn her doorway with flowers, their song will awaken the bride Stanza 4 Addressing the various nymphs of other natural locales, the groom asks that they tend to their specialties to make the wedding day perfect.

The nymphs who tend the ponds and lakes should make sure the water is clear and unmolested by lively fish, that they may see their own reflections in it and so best prepare themselves to be seen by the bride. The nymphs tooth mountains and woods, who keep deer safe from ravening wolves, should exercise their skills in keeping these selfsame wolves away from the bride this wedding day.

Both groups are to be present to help decorate the wedding site with their beauty. Stanza S The groom now addresses his bride directly even if she is not present to urge her to awaken. He urges he latter to do for his bride what they do for Venus, sing to her as they help her dress for her wedding.

Stanza 7 The bride is ready with her attendant virgins, so now is time for the groomsmen and the groom himself to prepare. He then prays to Phoebes, who is both sundo and originator of the arts, to give this one day of the year to him while keeping the rest for himself.

He offers to exchange his own poetry as an offering tort this great favor. Stanza 8 The mortal wedding guests and entertainment move into action. Those hearing the cries applaud the boys and join in with the song. In modesty, she avoids the gaze of the myriad admirers and blushes at the songs of praise she is receiving. Stanza 10 The groom asks the women Who see his bride if they have ever seen anyone so beautiful in their town before.

He then launches into a list of all her virtues, starting With her eyes and eventually describing her Whole body. Stanza 11 The groom moves from the external beauty of the bride to her internal beauty, which he claims to see better than anyone else. He praises her lively spirit, her sweet love, her chastity, her faith, her honor, and her modesty. He insists that could her observers see her inner beauty, they would be far more awestruck by it Han they already are by her outward appearance.

Stanza 12 The groom calls tort the doors to the temple to be opened that his bride may enter in and approach the altar in reverence, He offers his bride as an example tort the observing maidens to follow, tort she approaches this holy place with reverence and humility, Stanza 13 The bride stands before the altar as the priest offers his blessing upon her and upon the marriage, She blushes, causing the angels to forget their duties and encircle here, while the groom wonders why she should blush to give him her hand in marriage.

Stanza 15 The groom reiterates his affirmation that this day is holy and calls everyone to celebrate in response to the ringing bells. He exults that the sun is so bright and the day so beautiful, then changes his tone to regret as he realize his voiding is taking place on the summer solstice, the longest day Of the year, and so his eightieth nuptial bliss will be delayed all the longer, yet last only briefly.

Stanza The groom continues his frustrated complaint that the day is too long, but grows hopeful as at long last the evening begins its arrival. Stanza 17 The groom urges the singers and dancers to leave the wedding, but take the bride to her bed as they depart. He is eager to be alone with his bride, and amperes the sight of her lying in bed to that to Maim, the mountain goddess with whom Zeus conceived Hermes, Stanza 18 Night has come at last, and the groom asks Night to cover and protect them.

Stanza 19 The groom prays that no evil spirits or bad thoughts would reach the newlyweds this night. The entire stanza is a list of possible dangers he pleads to leave them alone Stanza 20 The groom bids silence to prevail and sleep to come when it is the proper time. These tiny Cupids are to enjoy themselves as much as possible until daybreak. Stanza 21 The groom notices Cynthia, the moon, peering through his window and prays to her for a favorable wedding night.

Stanza 22 The groom adds more deities to his list of patron. He asks Junco, wife of Zeus and goddess of marriage, to make their union strong and sacred, then turns her attention toward making it fruitful. So, too, he asks Web and Hymen to do the same for them.

Stanza 23 The groom utters and all-encompassing prayer to all the gods in the heavens, that they might bless this marriage. Author: Brandon Johnson.

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Epithalamion by Edmund Spenser

This poem was published originally with his sonnet sequence Amoretti in The tone of the poem is very hopeful, thankful, and sunny. And when ye list your owne mishaps to mourne, Which death, or love, or fortunes wreck did rayse, Your string could soone to sadder tenor turne, And teach the woods and waters to lament Your dolefull dreriment. Now lay those sorrowfull complaints aside, And having all your heads with girland crownd, Helpe me mine owne loves prayses to resound, Ne let the same of any be envide: So Orpheus did for his owne bride, So I unto my selfe alone will sing, The woods shall to me answer and my Eccho ring. Early before the worlds light giving lampe, His golden beame upon the hils doth spred, Having disperst the nights unchearefull dampe, Doe ye awake, and with fresh lusty hed, Go to the bowre of my beloved love, My truest turtle dove, Bid her awake; for Hymen is awake, And long since ready forth his maske to move, With his bright Tead that flames with many a flake, And many a bachelor to waite on him, In theyr fresh garments trim. Bid her awake therefore and soone her dight, For lo the wished day is come at last, That shall for al the paynes and sorrowes past, Pay to her usury of long delight: And whylest she doth her dight, Doe ye to her of joy and solace sing, That all the woods may answer and your eccho ring.

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Epithalamion

Spenser is very methodical in his depiction of time as it passes, both in the accurate chronological sense and in the subjective sense of time as felt by those waiting in anticipation or fear. As with most classically-inspired works, this ode begins with an invocation to the Muses to help the groom; however, in this case they are to help him awaken his bride, not create his poetic work. Then follows a growing procession of figures who attempt to bestir the bride from her bed. Once the sun has risen, the bride finally awakens and begins her procession to the bridal bower. She comes to the "temple" the sanctuary of the church wherein she is to be formally married to the groom and is wed, then a celebration ensues. Almost immediately, the groom wants everyone to leave and the day to shorten so that he may enjoy the bliss of his wedding night.

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Edmund Spenser's Epithalamion: Definition, Summary & Analysis

Please Sign Up to get full document. Spencer is very methodical in his depiction of time as it passes, both in the accurate chronological sense and in the subjective sense Of time as felt by those waiting in anticipation or fear. As with most classically-inspired works, this ode begins With an invocation to the Muses to help the groom; however, in this case they are o help him awaken his bride, not create his poetic work. Then follows a growing procession of figures who attempt to bestir the bride from her bed. Once the sun has risen, the bride finally awakens and begins her procession to the bridal bower.

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