LEE CANTER ASSERTIVE DISCIPLINE PDF

For elementary students these might be: Follow directions. Keep hands, feet, and objects to yourself. No teasing or name-calling. Assertive Discipline

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Procedure Teacher Techniques Assertive discipline is a systematic behavior management procedure designed by Lee Canter to put elementary and secondary classroom teachers in charge of their classes. Combining tenets from assertion training and behavior modification, Canter believes that he has identified four discipline competencies that all teachers need to master to handle problem behaviors successfully.

The competencies include: identifying appropriate behaviors that form the basis for classroom rules, systematically setting limits for inappropriate behavior, consistently reinforcing appropriate behavior, and working cooperatively with parents and principals. In this cookbook approach to discipline the steps for acquiring these competencies are detailed, even to the extent of specifying the number of rules and the number of negative consequences.

As in assertion training, teachers make their wants and needs known by directly responding to both appropriate and inappropriate student behaviors. If their requests are not met, a limit-setting, follow-through plan consisting of negative consequences is consistently applied. As in behavior modification, the teacher responds to appropriate behavior with positive reinforcers.

The teacher first verbally praises the student and, if necessary, continues with some type of a positive follow-through. These same assertive techniques are used to elicit assistance from the parents and principals. Rationale The assertive discipline procedure was developed as a response to a perceived lack of discipline in the public schools.

Students, teachers, and parents are all responsible for a lack of discipline. Though students today are more difficult to manage than in the past, the premise of assertive discipline is that all students-except those with organic problems can behave correctly, even though they may choose not to do so.

According to Canter, teachers expect and tolerate too much misbehavior, especially from students with emotional problems or from lower socioeconomic levels.

He believes they do not know how to deal with these students because they do not know how to be assertive. Neither of these approaches makes for a well-managed, positive classroom environment.

In turn, parents often do not support the classroom teacher and openly question the educational program. In a classroom setting, both teachers and students have needs that can be met within the assertive discipline program.

Students — no matter what age — need firm limits, discipline, and positive reinforcement. They also need teachers who care enough to stop their misbehaviors. Conversely, teachers need to keep students from manipulating them, and to feel free to request assistance from parents and principals.

Only when the needs of the teachers are satisfied will the needs of the students be fulfilled. Implementation Phases Assertive discipline is implemented in the following steps: 1. Develop rules based on observable behaviors. These rules should tell the students exactly what you want them to do. Limit the rules to five or six.

You may need different rules for various activities, such as recess, free time, reading groups, and so on. Clearly communicate and explain to the students the rules you have selected. It is a good idea to display the rules in written form somewhere in the classroom. The rules may change as the year progresses, and you need to inform the students of these changes. Practice being assertive in your responses to your students with verbal limit-setting.

However, touching should be used cautiously with secondary students and those likely to react negatively to it. Some students, especially those with problem in living, have learned to manipulate nonassertive teachers in verbal interactions by crying, making angry statements, or accusing the teacher of being unfair.

This type of verbal limit-setting shows the student that you will not be diverted from the objective the student beginning the assignment and that you are in control of the verbal interaction.

If the student does not comply with the three messages, limit setting follow-through should be initiated. Decide on the consequences. These consequences are administered when the students break the rules. Select consequences that you feel comfortable enforcing but that, at the same time, are unpleasant for the students.

Do not use physical or verbal abuse. Canter suggests a maximum of five negative consequences. In addition, you must select consequences for severe behavior problems. These necessitate more severe consequences than those selected to punish rule violations. Design a consequence plan. The five negative consequences are arranged in hierarchical order from less to more severe and then become part of the discipline plan.

Another part of the plan involves administration of the consequences. Negative consequences will not work unless you use them immediately every time a student breaks the rules or displays severe behavior. If a student reaches a consequence in the plan three times, the plan is not working and needs to be changed for that student.

Incorporate positive consequences into your plan. Just as with negative consequences, positive consequences must be administered consistently. Praise, tangible reinforcers, and a class wide token system are useful positive consequences.

Any type of praise is a powerful reinforcer for elementary students as long as it is genuine. Every student should be praised at least once a day. Consider giving praise to secondary students in private. The tangible reinforcer recommended for both elementary and secondary students is a progress note to be shared with the parents.

A token system in which elementary students earn marbles and secondary students earn points is suggested for class wide reinforcement. The tokens are then exchanged for backup reinforcers, such as a party, free time, elimination of a homework assignment, or some other positive consequence. In using the marble system in the elementary classroom, give one marble per day to the regular students and three to five to the students with problems in living.

In the secondary classroom, give one mark per student with problems in living per period. Avoid taking points or marbles away.

A class-wide reinforcement system is not necessary in all classrooms, but positive praise and notes are. If Step 5 is not working, it may be because positive reinforcement is being presented too infrequently. Actively involve parents and principals in the consequence plan. Send your discipline plan home and have the parents sign it. Communicate both positive and negative information about the student to the parents. Plan to send notes home for each student during the first two weeks of school.

Immediately call the parents whenever the student does not follow the rules. Remember to be assertive in communications with parents.

The parents should also be involved in the administration of positive and negative consequences. Bedtime is a powerful consequence, whether it involves staying up later as a reward or going to bed earlier as a punishment.

Use these same assertive procedures when communicating the discipline plan to the principal. In a school in which assertive discipline was in effect in all classrooms, the faculty and principal had met together to decide on the general rules and the discipline plan.

The following five rules were selected: 1. Keep hands, feet, objects to yourself. Whisper quietly when you are doing seat work so your voice cannot be heard by the teacher. Raise your hand. Follow directions the first time. Do not use cussing or teasing. These rules were discussed by the teacher with the students and were posted in all special classes and in Grades 1 through 5. Rules varied for recess time and they were posted on the playground wall.

Each day the marks would be erased and the students would begin the next day with a clean slate. The severe clause in the plan provided for an isolation room monitored by the teachers on a rotating basis during their free time. All of the teachers decided to use praise and to send notes home as positive reinforcement, except for the special class teacher who would use points along with the other reinforcers.

The discipline plan was sent home for the parents to sign, and the first PTA meeting was spent discussing the discipline approach. All of the teachers followed the same format in implementation of the plan. If a student disobeyed a rule, two other students who were following the rule were praised.

If the student continued with the inappropriate behavior, a negative consequence with a choice statement was administered. Each day the teachers tried to praise each student in their classes at least once; the mainstreamed special education students were praised more often. The discipline plan did not work with a boy in the fourth grade. This student was a manipulator and often argued when the teacher administered a consequence for his inappropriate behavior.

He was also frequently in fights. One day the teacher was taking the student to isolation the severe clause for fighting. The boy denied his part in the fight by placing the blame on others.

You chose to break one of the rules. However, the fighting episodes continued, and the boy spent the next two days in the isolation room. Since the isolation consequence was apparently ineffective, the classroom teacher, the special class teacher, and the principal conferred and decided on an alternative plan of suspension from school.

They conferred with the parents, and the parents agreed to pick up the student when the principal called. However, on Monday of the next week he exploded and kicked and bit a student.

The alternative plan was put into effect. Evidently the boy had waited until the mother was not at home to explode. Sure enough, no one answered the phone.

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01 Assertive Discipline

Procedure Teacher Techniques Assertive discipline is a systematic behavior management procedure designed by Lee Canter to put elementary and secondary classroom teachers in charge of their classes. Combining tenets from assertion training and behavior modification, Canter believes that he has identified four discipline competencies that all teachers need to master to handle problem behaviors successfully. The competencies include: identifying appropriate behaviors that form the basis for classroom rules, systematically setting limits for inappropriate behavior, consistently reinforcing appropriate behavior, and working cooperatively with parents and principals. In this cookbook approach to discipline the steps for acquiring these competencies are detailed, even to the extent of specifying the number of rules and the number of negative consequences. As in assertion training, teachers make their wants and needs known by directly responding to both appropriate and inappropriate student behaviors. If their requests are not met, a limit-setting, follow-through plan consisting of negative consequences is consistently applied.

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Types of Classroom Management: Assertive Discipline

According to Canter, well-behaved students have the right to learn in a classroom without distraction. This means that the teacher must discipline poorly behaved students in the best interests of the rest of the class. The Right to Teach. Teachers should be given the same right to a peaceful working environment as other professionals. Teachers must be in Control.

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Brief overview[ edit ] Assertive discipline is a structured, systematic approach designed to assist educators in running an organized, teacher-in-charge classroom environment. Today, it is the most widely used behavior management program Walker, They also marketed products aimed at educating teachers on other topics such as motivation, violence prevention, conflict resolution, and instructional strategies with titles like "How to Get Parents On Your SideTM". They provided professional development training for teachers, and materials that could be used by universities for degree programs and graduate-level course work. In , Canter and Associates Inc. Teachers recognize and support students when they behave appropriately, including consistently praising good behavior.

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