CALASSO KA PDF

Biography Edit Calasso was born in Florence in , into a family of the Tuscan upper class, well connected with some of the great Italian intellectuals of their time. His maternal grandfather Ernesto Codignola was a professor of philosophy at Florence University. He was arrested by the fascist militia after the assassination of Giovanni Gentile and sentenced to be killed in reprisal, but was saved by the intervention of both friends of Gentile, with whom the family had connections on the maternal side, and by the German consul Gerhard Wolf. In the family moved to Rome, where Calasso developed a passion for cinema. His books have been translated into most European languages. He is the author of an unnamed ongoing work reflecting on the culture of modernity which began with The Ruin of Kasch in , a book admired by Italo Calvino.

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Save Story Save this story for later. I also recall feeling that this dark, meandering quest for something goofy yet possibly profound was an elemental Calasso experience: in every way corresponding to the style in which he lives with an astonishing coherence possible for few literary figures today. Here, for over thirty years he has produced a remarkable eclectic line of books, whose elegant black spines and muted colors fill entire walls in the houses of Italians with any claim to high culture.

Adelphi authors range from Simenon to Athanasius Kircher to Anna Maria Ortese—a collection almost exclusively shaped by the personal appeal of each to the subtle fancy of Calasso, who lives for books and ideas in a way that goes beyond the hermetic existence of the most unworldly university professor and seems to take him outside of time and space. Rather than exploring ideas, his books invoke spirits—of places, cultural periods, personalities.

Although they seem to deal with wildly heterogeneous subjects, each book is linked to the others by its ample, universalist style—with a Cecil B. DeMille-size cast of artists, thinkers, hangers-on ,and divinities large and small—and recurrent themes. Calasso illuminates this image of Baudelaire: the first poet to describe the shocking beauty of a decomposing corpse; to define the mixture of disgust, boredom, alienation, and fear that hung like a permanent fever mist in the brain of the city-dweller; to glory in the allure of the unhealthy, perverse and deformed, of the artificial and mechanical, of dissonance and fragmentation—all the scenery of destruction and despair that would become the natural landscape of writers from Kafka to Sartre and onward.

Calasso gives order to this sea of names and details by framing his text with three powerful images of Baudelaire. The book opens with the first: a subtly disturbing note written by the poet to his mother Caroline, inviting her, in the insinuating tone of a clandestine lover, to meet him at the Louvre. Calasso is at his best as he playfully expands the metaphor, suggesting that, rather than being an anchorite, Baudelaire was actually a pioneer, whose fanciful construction eventually formed the nucleus of a settlement of his cultural heirs, from Rimbaud and Laforgue to Proust, Nietszche, Chopin, Kafka, and Wagner.

No, positively the most agreeable way to read these books is to become a literary flaneur, to adopt a meandering pace and a open-minded, mildly impulsive attitude, as if one were lazily following a chain of associations through the Internet. In fact in this overstimulated age of viral memes, music sampling, and mass A. One learns to ramble through his labyrinthine series of Wunderkammer, speeding past what looks unreasonably opaque, pausing here and there to enjoy some mesmerizing bit of trivia.

Who but Calasso, for example, would have unearthed a schoolboyish note written from Baudelaire to Saint-Beuve about gingerbread? Calasso may identify with his hero, but there is no Baudelairean melancholy in his work. This mood is catching, and if one adopts the right dreamy pace, one can commune with Calasso through a kind of imaginative osmosis—a word and image the author adores. That which is not manifest is much more vast than that which is manifest.

The invisible is greater than the visible. So it is also for language…. Only because language casts a shadow both much vaster than itself, and inaccessible, does the spoken word hold and renew such magic. White, Dorothy Parker, and Stephan Zweig, to name just a few. Calasso looked over the table of contents with the air of a gourmet studying a three-star menu, then gave one of his rare smiles.

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CALASSO KA PDF

Save Story Save this story for later. I also recall feeling that this dark, meandering quest for something goofy yet possibly profound was an elemental Calasso experience: in every way corresponding to the style in which he lives with an astonishing coherence possible for few literary figures today. Here, for over thirty years he has produced a remarkable eclectic line of books, whose elegant black spines and muted colors fill entire walls in the houses of Italians with any claim to high culture. Adelphi authors range from Simenon to Athanasius Kircher to Anna Maria Ortese—a collection almost exclusively shaped by the personal appeal of each to the subtle fancy of Calasso, who lives for books and ideas in a way that goes beyond the hermetic existence of the most unworldly university professor and seems to take him outside of time and space. Rather than exploring ideas, his books invoke spirits—of places, cultural periods, personalities. Although they seem to deal with wildly heterogeneous subjects, each book is linked to the others by its ample, universalist style—with a Cecil B. DeMille-size cast of artists, thinkers, hangers-on ,and divinities large and small—and recurrent themes.

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Shelves: murder-weapons , bedrock A bloody, feverish story has embedded itself in the sky. It reminds us that it will go on happening forever. Fitting, that in this retelling of what are some of the oldest stories known to man that Ka translates as the space between, or Who? For its the mystery that we are after in this existence. Now I know that this question will haunt us forever, until time itself dissolves. Calassos book accounts the gods, as if, in their doings, our own plight is revealed.

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