HARNESSING THE SCIENCE OF PERSUASION CIALDINI PDF

Liking Consensus Understanding these shortcuts and employing them in an ethical manner can significantly increase the chances that someone will be persuaded by your request. The first universal Principle of Influence is Reciprocity. Simply put, people are obliged to give back to others the form of a behavior, gift, or service that they have received first. If a colleague does you a favor, then you owe that colleague a favor. And in the context of a social obligation people are more likely to say yes to those who they owe.

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In it, Dr. Paul Marsden, Editor of Social Commerce Today, references six heuristics mental rules of thumb that shoppers use, often intuitively, to make purchase decisions. The father of this heuristic thinking model is Dr. Robert B. Cialdini , an academician best known for his popular book on persuasion and marketing, Influence: The Psychology of Persuasion. Cialdini addresses each of the six heuristics within the context of how these subtle psychological pressures can be used to get people to say yes to requests.

These six tendencies are: reciprocation, consistency, social validation, liking, authority and scarcity. Reciprocation Rule: All societies subscribe to a norm that obligates individuals to repay in kind what they have received.

Example: Charitable organizations often use this heuristic approach to increase donations. A free gift, even one that is unsolicited, exerts a powerful influence on the amount and percentage of donations received. Reciprocity includes more than gifts and favors. It also applies to concessions that people make to one another. Large requests that may tend to be rejected are replaced by smaller ones that are accepted.

Consistency Rule: Public commitments, even seemingly minor ones, direct future action. Consistency played a role due to the fact that, two weeks prior, residents had been asked to sign a petition stating their support of the handicapped.

Example: Stopping to gaze skyward, even for no apparent reason, will induce others to follow suit. The greater number of people engaged in the activity served to further validate the reasonableness of the action. People prefer to say yes to those they like. Physical attractiveness can also be a element that contribute to liking. Other factors that increase liking activity include similarity, compliments and cooperation. Scarcity affects the value not only of commodities but of information as well.

Conclusion Dr.

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Speed Summary: The Science of Persuasion

Many executives have assumed that this tool is beyond their grasp, available only to the charismatic and the eloquent. Over the past several decades, though, experimental psychologists have learned which methods reliably lead people to concede, comply, or change. Their research shows that persuasion is governed by several principles that can be taught and applied. The first principle is that people are more likely to follow someone who is similar to them than someone who is not. Wise managers, then, enlist peers to help make their cases. Second, people are more willing to cooperate with those who are not only like them but who like them, as well. Third, experiments confirm the intuitive truth that people tend to treat you the way you treat them.

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